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Workshop: Writing and Research, from Start to Finish

Writing and Research, from Start to Finish: A Series of Workshops for the Undergraduate Writer

Sponsored by the Harvard College Writing Program

and the Harvard College Library

Getting Started: Locating and Evaluating Sources for Research Papers  

Thursday, April 5

3:00-4:30 pm in the Lamont Forum Room, third floor, Lamont Library

 An overview of the research landscape in the Harvard College Libraries.  Find out about essential and efficient strategies for starting out on a research paper, including how to use the Harvard College Library’s vast online resources to locate credible sources and how to evaluate the sources you find.

 Research Clinics: Hands-on Sessions for Students Writing Research Papers

Monday, April 9

3:00-4:30 pm in Room B-30, Lamont Library

 AND

 Tuesday, April 10

3:00-4:30 pm in Room B-30, Lamont Library

Meet with Reference Librarians from Widener, Lamont and Cabot Libraries and representatives from the Writing Program for research tips and suggestions about finding sources for the research papers you are writing this spring.  The Research Clinic is designed as an interactive session; please bring your laptop with you, as well as the assignments for any research papers you are working on.

 From Research to Paper: Using Your Sources and Avoiding Plagiarism

Thursday, April 19

4:00-5:30 pm in the Lamont Forum Room, third floor, Lamont Library

Learn about how to integrate source material into your own paper and how to approach the research and writing process to avoid plagiarism. You’ll hear tips on how to determine the role each source may play in your argument, and how to summarize, paraphrase, and quote effectively.

Register for each workshop separately by sending your name, email address, and title of workshop that you wish to attend to expos@fas.harvard.edu. Use “Writing Workshop” in your subject line.

A Conversation with Paul Harding, Winner of the 2010 Pulitzer Prize!

Workshop: Reading Out Loud

Reading Out Loud:

A Workshop for Writers

Thursday, March 22, 4:30-6:00 pm

Woodberry Poetry Room, Lamont Library

Ever felt nervous reading your poetry, stories, or essays aloud?

Come get tips from the experts. Elise Morrison, Associate Director

for Speaking Instruction at the Bok Center for Teaching and Learning,
conducts this workshop on public presentation for creative writers.

Bring a one- to two-page sample of your work and come
prepared to try out some new techniques!

Brought to you by the Peer Speaking Tutor Program and Harvard Writers at Work

Free and open to the public

Writing Narrative Journalism: A Conversation with Gay Talese and Chris Jones

Writing Narrative Journalism: A Conversation with Gay Talese and Chris Jones
2 pm, Friday, November 18
Fong Auditorium
Boylston Hall
Literary journalism icon Gay Talese is the bestselling author of eleven books. He was a reporter for the New York Times from 1956 to 1965, and since then he has written for the Times, Esquire, The New Yorker, Harper’s Magazine, and other national publications. His groundbreaking article “Frank Sinatra Has a Cold” was named the “best story Esquire ever published,” and he was credited by Tom Wolfe with the creation of an inventive form of nonfiction writing called “The New Journalism.” His most recent book, A Writer’s Life, was published by Knopf in 2006 and reissued in trade paperback by The Random House Publishing Group in July 2007. A collection of his sportswriting, The Silent Season of a Hero, was published by Walker & Company in September 2010.

Chris Jones, Esquire magazine writer-at-large, has twice won the National Magazine Award, the first for his story “Home,” which chronicled the experiences of three astronauts stranded on the space station when the shuttle Columbia exploded, and the second for his article “The Things That Carried Him,” which told the story of one soldier’s last trip home from Iraq. He is a contributing editor for ESPN: The Magazine. His work has appeared in Best American Magazine Writing and Best American Sports Writing.

Mr. Talese’s and Mr. Jones’s conversation is co-sponsored by the Nieman Foundation and the Harvard Writers at Work Lecture Series, which is co-sponsored by the Harvard College Writing Program, the Harvard Review, the and Harvard Extension School Master”s Degree Program in Journalism. The Series seeks to explore the power of writing at Harvard and beyond.

Next week's events in the Harvard Writers at Work Lecture Series

Harvard Law School Professor Jonathan Zittrain on The Future of Writing and How to Stop It, Thurs., Oct 6, 7:30 pm

Jonathan Zittrain
“The Future of Writing and How to Stop It”
7:30 pm, Thursday, October 6
Thompson Room,
The Barker Center

Mr. Zittrain is Professor of Law at Harvard Law School and the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, Professor of Computer Science at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, and co-founder of the Berkman Center for Internet & Society. His research interests include battles for control of digital property and content, cryptography, electronic privacy, the roles of intermediaries within Internet architecture, human computing, and the useful and unobtrusive deployment of technology in education.
In addition to discussing some of the ideas in his book The Future of the Internet — And How to Stop It, Professor Zittrain will talk about his own craft of writing and the state of writing in the digital era. His talk will be followed by a question and answer period.   
The Future of the Internet — And How to Stop It is available from Yale University Press and Penguin UK — and under a Creative Commons license.  Papers may be found at <http://www.jz.org <http://www.jz.org/> >.

Professor Zittrain’s talk is part of the Harvard Writers at Work Lecture Series, sponsored by the Harvard College Writing Program, the Harvard Review, the Harvard Extension School Writing Program, and the Program in General Education. The Series seeks to explore the power of writing at Harvard and beyond.
  
Get advice on the craft of travel writing from a panel of professional travel writers, Tues, Oct. 4, 7:30 pm  


How do you vividly capture a travel experience for readers who weren’t there with you? What makes for memorable travel writing? How do you get your travel writing published? Come hear a panel of professional travel writers discuss the art and craft of travel writing.
 
Adam Sachs, contributing editor, Travel + Leisure and Bon Appétit

Danielle Pergament, executive editor, Lucky Magazine and New York Times travel writer
 
Josh Dean, travel writer and former deputy editor of Men’s Journal

Harvard Writers at Work

Harvard Writers at Work is launching its 2011-2012 lecture series next week. This series, sponsored by the Harvard College Writing Program, the Harvard Review, the Harvard Extension School Writing Program, and the Program in General Education,  seeks to explore the power of writing at Harvard and beyond. 

This is a great series. We’ll be posting information about all of their events, so watch this space!

How to Write a Philosophy Paper

Dave Langlois, Departmental Writing Fellow in Philosophy, will present a workshop on the fundamentals of writing in philosophy on September 14 at 3 pm in Emerson 101.  He will discuss the mechanics of writing philosophy papers, introduce students to how philosophy papers are evaluated, and provide some tips for philosophical writing.

How To Read and Write in the Sciences

Dean of Harvard Law School to talk about writing

“Writing About a Landmark Case”
A talk about law, history, and writing by Martha Minow
Dean of Harvard Law School and author of “In Brown’s Wake:  Legacies of America’s Educational Landmark.”

Tuesday, March 1
7:30 p.m.
Thompson Room
Barker Center
12 Quincy Street
Cambridge, MA

Open to the Public

The Harvard Writers at Work Lecture Series is co-sponsored by the Harvard College Writing Program, the Harvard Extension School, the Harvard Review, and the Harvard College Program in General Education. The Series seeks to bring together students, faculty, and others in the Harvard community and the public to think about the transformational power of writing in people’s lives and in the world.